‘How Did I Get Here?’ (podcast interview)

If you ever wondered ‘How Did I Get Here?’ – Here is a recent interview I gave that may be helpful if your early in your career.

Did you ever wonder ‘How Did I Get Here?’ (link) – This is a recent interview I gave that may be helpful if you are starting your career.

Listen to this short podcast interview series by Jason Fish on anchor.fm – listeners can also find it on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and many other listening platforms. Enjoy! ##careerpaths #innovatorsmindset #orgchanger

 

Innovation Management 2020 – Metrics and Success Factors

Join me for my guest lecture on “Innovation Management – Metrics and Success Factors” as part of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship track in the MBA International Business Management and Leadership curriculum at the Hochschule Kempten, University of Applied Sciences, in Germany on June 01, 2019.

Join me for my upcoming guest lecture on “Innovation Management – Metrics and Success Factors” as part of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship track in the MBA International Business Management and Leadership curriculum at the Hochschule Kempten, University of Applied Sciences, in Germany on July 26, 2020.

In this track, we also discuss the teaching case study Boehringer Ingelheim: Leading Innovation (available at Harvard Business Review) featuring Stephan Klaschka’s corporate career as an innovator and intrapreneur at Boehringer Ingelheim.
This case study was written by the Ivey Business School, University of Western Ontario, Canada, and is used for education by universities and colleges across Europe, America, and Asia.

Join me at the Automotive & Mobility Forum, NYC, 24. March 2020

Join me at the Automotive & Mobility Forum, NYC, 24.Mar.2020

Automotive & Mobility Forum
The German-American Chamber of Commerce in New York (GACCNY), invites you to join the Automotive & Mobility Forum on March 24, 2020. An expert panel from the automotive industry will give you insights on major trends that are currently reshaping the automotive industry: electric vehicles, autonomous vehicles, connected vehicles, and mobility as a service.
Based on feedback from past events, GACCNY welcomes back Gary Silberg, Partner & National Automotive Leader at KPMG. In his keynote speech, he will examine the trends stated in his latest publication and report on the increasing importance of semiconductors in the innovation process.
This event sold out in the past, early registration is encouraged. GACC members will get registration priority. Register here.
This event is free for members and $45 for non-members.

Innovation Management – Metrics and Success Factors

Join me for my guest lecture on “Innovation Management – Metrics and Success Factors” as part of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship track in the MBA International Business Management and Leadership curriculum at the Hochschule Kempten, University of Applied Sciences, in Germany on June 01, 2019.

Join me for my upcoming guest lecture on “Innovation Management – Metrics and Success Factors” as part of the Innovation and Entrepreneurship track in the MBA International Business Management and Leadership curriculum at the Hochschule Kempten, University of Applied Sciences, in Germany on June 01, 2019.

In this track, we also discuss the teaching case study Boehringer Ingelheim: Leading Innovation (available at Harvard Business Review) featuring Stephan Klaschka’s corporate career as an innovator and intrapreneur at Boehringer Ingelheim.
This case study was written by the Ivey Business School, University of Western Ontario, Canada, and is used for education by universities and colleges across Europe, America, and Asia.

IoT in pharma manufacturing changes company culture

Digital transformation comes with unforeseen yet sometimes very beneficial consequences. Who would have guessed that introducing IoT (Internet of Things) to pharmaceutical manufacturing could have a broader transformational impact on a traditionally conservative company culture?

Conservative Pharma Industry

As a bit of background information, there are many reasons why the pharmaceutical industry tends to be more risk-averse than others. Here are some key considerations:

  • Long-term investment:
    Developing an innovative new drug easily takes 10 years and costs $2.6Bn upfront (according to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, PhRMA) before the actual product reaches the market. Pharmaceutical development remains a high-cost, high-risk business where mistakes are punished harshly and can ruin a company.
  • Regulated industry
    Regulatory authorities, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States and corresponding agencies around the world, closely inspect every aspect of the development, manufacturing, and marketing of medicinal drug products from pharma companies. If a company is found out of compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), severe financial penalties can be imposed and drastic consequences loom – including shutting down the business altogether.
  • Human lives are at stake
    Pharmaceutical manufacturing is where the rubber hits the road: Any problems in the manufacturing process can easily affect product quality and thereby directly threaten the health and lives of patients. Every facet must be closely observed, and regulatory inspections are frequent and thorough. Therefore, changes to the manufacturing environment are done most reluctantly by companies to minimize risks.

The burden from these limitations weighs heavy on the organization and lends itself to a conservative mindset and cautious approach. Change is not always welcome as it induces risk that could jeopardize operations and outcomes.

Moving to IoT

The Internet of Things (IoT) is more than just a bunch of devises and sensors that communicate with each other and generate a constant stream of data: IoT affects not only how we (make things) work but can also affect how we think and the foundation for our decision-making.

The traditional process in pharmaceutical manufacturing produces batches of product. It requires many human process steps from preparing and calibrating machinery, running the batch, examining the quality and then cleaning and preparing the equipment again for the next batch of the same or an entirely different product. During the process, devices collect data in their own ‑often proprietary‑ data formats that may be hard to access. The data has to be collected, combined and interpreted in a time-consuming process full of interpretation barriers and prone to human error. Even worse, “over 70% of the data in manufacturing is never touched” according to the CEO of Bigfinite, an IoT provider, and certainly not timely. This comes at a cost as this example shows: An American pharma company reportedly lost $20 million worth of product when a $3,500 vacuum pump broke down.

Around 30% of the Top 20 pharma companies started introducing IoT in their pharmaceutical manufacturing (according to GEP, a supply-chain advisory firm) to enable faster and continuous data collection from several processes for real-time monitoring, integrated analytics, and more timely decision-making. The paramount goal was to meet regulatory demand, such as the FDA requirement for continued process verification.

What comes with IoT

However, IoT relies on Cloud computing to provide digital connectivity across the entire supply chain from production to market and across plants. IoT Cloud computing may come with the necessity to use third-party-run servers for data storage and calculations raising the all too familiar fears of pharma managers and employees. Often enough it is the employees who interpret regulatory guidance to narrowly and don’t dare to rock the boat by changing the current GMP (cGMP) out of inflated data security concerns and the doomy risk of falling out of compliance.

While care certainly needs to be taken when implementing the new technology and while processes need to remain compliant, the FDA has already shown flexibility and set a precedence in approving the shift from batch to continuous manufacturing for Johnson&Johnson’s HIV drug PREZISTA.

More recently, the regulatory concern no longer seems paramount. Instead, management understands that IoT opens the door to massive and much-needed cost savings, shorter cycle time, right-sizing operations, increased productivity and higher competitiveness in the highly competitive pharmaceutical market arena.

People transformation beyond digital

Interestingly, all these more technical aspects can distract from how IoT in pharmaceutical manufacturing can lead to a broader shift of mindset throughout the organization:

Sharing and compiling formerly compartmentalized data across different parts of an organizational practically breaks the well-established and well-protected silos in many organizations. Suddenly, everyone seems connected to everyone else in the company and departmental borders fall while the process becomes visible and more transparent in real-time.

The fundamental shift with IoT and Cloud computing forces management and workers to adapt to the new technology and to connect with others outside their immediate organizational silo. The newly integrated informatics can include Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and financial systems. Sharing the data trove happens not only within a manufacturing plant but also across 25 plants at Pfizer, for example.

The technology-induced visibility and management of the manufacturing process challenges the traditional mode of operation and encourages employees trying out something new. If managed well, this mindset shift can be used to crack the barriers and drive a favorable cultural change throughout the organization. It enables but also pushes employees to continuously improve manufacturing operations while it also translates and proliferates into all other aspects of their work.

Summary

IoT technology in pharmaceutical manufacturing not only improves the productivity and competitiveness while maintaining regulatory compliance but also challenges and steers employee mindset away from overly conservative restraint toward collaboration and continuous improvement – and thereby shifts the organizational in favorable directions.

New York Times: “Social connections … are keys to happiness and health”

How do you build healthy social connections in the digital age? #VirtualDistance

We read daily now that “social connections, in a very real way, are keys to happiness and health” as a recent New York Times article puts it. At a time where we humans with our smart-phones and social media apps should be connected more than ever, we also sense a “Virtual Distance” that removed context from our digital interactions: We look into a screen that mirrors not only our own face but also projects our own experiences, assumptions, beliefs and biases into the conversation, as our brains unconsciously fill in the gaps and provides a (wrong) context to the world of the other person that in return ‘makes sense’ to us – it just is not the reality on the other end.

As a result, we have a distorted relationship with the other person and a skewed social connection. This also affects our behavior based on wrong information. In our private life, this may lead to us mutually and unknowingly drifting away as friends, which may fuel the feeling of isolation over time. At work, there are significant and measurable consequences that can have a devastating impact on our relationships with colleagues as well as on critical business outcomes across a range of indicators; including trust, innovative capabilities, employee engagement, leadership effectiveness and many more.

The Virtual Distance Model brings these issues into awareness, gives us a language to precisely express the issues as well as a metrics and tools on how to lower the Virtual Distance surrounding us every day. Managing Virtual Distance successfully holds not only the keys to happiness and health but also to measurably better business outcomes.

#VirtualDistance www.VirtualDistance.com

Intrapreneurship Case Study at the Foreign Trade University (FTU), Vietnam

Students of the Creativity, Innovation and New Value course at Colorado State University discuss the popular teaching case study “Boehringer Ingelheim: Leading Innovation” (available at Harvard Business Review (HBR) and the Ivey Business School) with intrapreneur Stephan Klaschka.

Intrapreneurship Case Study at the Foreign Trade University (FTU), 

As a cooperation between Colorado State University (CSU) and the Foreign Trade University (FTU) in Hanoi, Vietnam, FTU students are tasked to develop an opportunity in a team and conduct a feasibility analysis on the opportunity that they present to the class on June 4, 2018.

I will join the students and visiting CSU professor Robert Mitchell for a live discussion of the teaching case study Boehringer Ingelheim: Leading Innovation, which is available at Harvard Business Review (HBR) and the Ivey Business School,

In this teaching case study, the case writers Professor J. Robert Mitchell, Ph.D., and Ramasastry Chandrasekhar, of Ivey Business School, follow the footsteps of Stephan Klaschka’s intrapreneurial approach to innovation within a global pharmaceutical company (FORTUNE Global 500, Top 20 Pharma).

This intrapreneurship teaching case study is used by staff and students of Intrapreneurship and Innovation in business schools around the world. and features my career as an Intrapreneur at a major pharmaceutical company.

HBR-logoIvey-logo

Discussing HBR Intrapreneuring Case Study “Leading Innovation” at CSU

Students of the Creativity, Innovation and New Value course at Colorado State University discuss the popular teaching case study “Boehringer Ingelheim: Leading Innovation” (available at Harvard Business Review (HBR) and the Ivey Business School) with intrapreneur Stephan Klaschka.

HBR-logo 150x150

On April 26, 2018, students of the Creativity, Innovation and New Value course at Colorado State University discuss the popular teaching case study “Boehringer Ingelheim: Leading Innovation” (available at Harvard Business Review (HBR) and the Ivey Business School) with intrapreneur Stephan Klaschka.


The case writers Professor J. Robert Mitchell, Ph.D., and Ramasastry Ivey-logoChandrasekhar, of Ivey Business School, follow the footsteps of Stephan’s intrapreneurial approach to innovation from within a global pharmaceutical company (FORTUNE Global 500, Top 20 Pharma).  This intrapreneurship teaching case study is used by staff and students of Intrapreneurship and Innovation in business schools around the world.  It is available for download at

What is the difference between Intrapreneuring and Corporate Entrepreneuring?

Intrapreneuring and Corporate Entrepreneurship are very different and directly affect business outcomes.  Read about both approaches, their distinct opportunities, and challenges.

For many years I have worked as an Intrapreneur. I advised startups, built intrapreneurial eco-systems across global organizations, and mentored corporate teams applying Lean Startup and other entrepreneurial methodologies in Corporate Entrepreneurship programs.

The question that came up frequently was about the difference between intrapreneuring and corporate entrepreneuring: Are they the same?

The quick answer is ‘No’ as there are significant differences on many levels that directly affect the business outcomes.  Both approaches come with distinct opportunities and challenges (see also the comparison table below):

Idea Origin

  • The Intrapreneur finds a bold idea that can have the potential to transform or even save the business but may not align with the business plans and priorities of the company – more likely, the idea is not anywhere on the management’s radar.
  • The Corporate Entrepreneur receives the objective together with a project handed down by management. The idea (project scope) is a business goal of sorts that the Corporate Entrepreneur should address.

Ownership

In a large company, jobs are small. The increasing complexity and high specialization of work in a large organization narrow the responsibility and job descriptions for the individual employee. In a small company, in contrast, jobs are big since there are only a few people who need to step up and cover all aspects of the business – the individuals ‘own’ and contribute to the success of the business directly and to large degrees.

  • In this context, Intrapreneurs make an idea their own which determines the mission and scope of the intrapreneurial quest, the ‘intraprise’. The Intrapreneur assumes ownership and full responsibility for the idea and brings it to life – even against the resistance of the organization. Thus, the Intrapreneur runs his or her own, small ‘intraprise’ with full responsibility, freedom to operate and navigate in any way and direction imaginable, and -therefore- has a big job (just like an entrepreneur).
  • The Corporate Entrepreneur receives the project objectives handed down by management and is held responsible for delivering on project results as scoped. The idea directly translates down from a business goal of sorts. The Corporate Entrepreneur usually runs or contributes to a ‘small job’ project that is temporary. This project scope and small job perspective together with the time limit can also affect process and outcomes as it can easily narrow the solution space, or adjusting and ‘pivoting’ by re-aiming, for example, at opportunities beyond the original or change the scope of the idea altogether.

Passion

The Idea Origin and Ownership are key to the single most important driving force for an Intrapreneur: Passion.
The importance of being passionate about the idea is essential because passion is needed to persist and to bring about change against the resistance many obstacles an Intrapreneur runs into. The resistance of the organization is a sign of meaningful change entailing the intrapreneurial idea; therefore, facing resistance can be a positive sign.

  • An Intrapreneur committed and passionate about the idea will try everything and get very creative in bringing the idea to life.
  • The Corporate Entrepreneur usually is not truly passionate about a project handed down by management and being held responsible for delivering on the project as scoped.

Mandate

‘Intrapreneur’ is a self-assumed role in the organization and, therefore, operates without a formal mandate, organizational support or assigned resources. On the upside, the Intrapreneur does not have an answer to a superior. The challenge is, however, to get creative to find allies and resources in an organization unprepared to formally support the Intrapreneur. This lack of formal authority and institutional support by management also comes with considerable risk for the Intrapreneur and the idea.

The Corporate Entrepreneur has a clear mandate and already receives support from management usually within the given operational framework of the approved project. The project scope is narrow which translates into limited resources and restricted freedom to navigate. Furthermore, the project comes with timelines and expectations by sponsors whose patience can run out fast when the team misses milestones or falls short on expectations. Thus, Corporate Entrepreneuring, more often than not, is a glorified term for ‑usually‑ quite ordinary projects of incremental nature along established processes.

Mindset and Results

The limited scope, resources, and overall operational framework define a ‘box’ for the Corporate Entrepreneurs to operate in within the larger organization and the path on how to get there. Often enough these limits extend also into the mindset and open-mindedness of the team and their approaches. Real or perceived restrictions can originate from various factors present in the established organization such as formal process and procedures, authority and hierarchy, values and norms, group-think and taboos, etc.

Corporate Entrepreneurs operate openly and under the constant scrutiny of the larger organization. The latter can take uninvited influence on the project scope, progress, process, resources, results, and success as well as on the project team itself. Being able to leverage the resources of the larger organization can be very helpful when it comes to implementation and scaling (if it ever comes to his point) but operating in the limelight is not always helpful and may easily lead to compromises, trade-offs, and scope-creep induced by powerful stakeholder.

The Intrapreneur is not as limited by the formal boundaries, practices, and culture of the organization. Being able to operate outside the box lends itself to pursuing a bold and disruptive idea, taking unconventional and stealthy approaches and pathways that help to move the idea forward ‑ the sky is the limit. Operating in the shadows initially avoids drawing broader attention to the idea. Preventing premature exposure to the ‘organizational immune-system.’ Once triggered, it tends to quickly put an end to the unconventional idea and their champion. A stealthy Intrapreneur can more cautiously test the waters, find experts and executive supporters also outside the own business unit, and allow the idea to take shape, evolve, and mature before taking the risk of exposure.

Exposure comes with a range of possible outcomes where the idea can then can slip beyond the control of the Intrapreneur including:

  • Shutting down the idea and implementation altogether or watering it down by absorbing it into the regular structures and processes of the organization
  • Bringing the idea to life by creating a new company structure and business altogether
  • The Intrapreneur leaving the organization to pursue the idea elsewhere

I have seen all of these outcomes many times throughout my career as an Intrapreneur and executive consultant.

Reward

What are rewards can look very different for Intrapreneurs and Corporate Entrepreneurs. The latter delivers a project and may get recognition for it, a bonus or promotion even, before moving on to the next assignment.

The Intrapreneur, however, has a much greater sense of accomplishment and fulfillment for the passionate Intrapreneur having brought a great idea to life against all obstacles and resistance of the organization.

Comparison in Summary

From my perspective, the main difference is that an intrapreneur has a calling, a vision, that he or she wants to bring to life for the better of the organization even against the resistance of an organization. Intrapreneuring is an active expression of organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB), i.e. ‘helping behaviors’, with going beyond the call of an employee’s duty. It requires intrapreneurial spirit with passion and guts to pursue challenges and to overcome obstacles day after day which includes taking risks including to stand all alone against the organization at times. This can make some Intrapreneurs even leave their organization to make their dream come true elsewhere or on their own.

While Corporate Entrepreneuring propagates introducing entrepreneurial methods within an established organization, if you look beyond its fancy label and a vendor’s prospectus, the approach ‑most often in my experience‑ remains shackled by numerous institutional constraints. Therefore, these program falls short to deliver the true potential of entrepreneurship or intrapreneurship. Instead, the solutions tend to remain in the more predictable space of incremental improvement that large organizations are more accustomed to and feel comfortable to operate in.

Thus, the average Corporate Entrepreneur is not an Intrapreneur by any means and not an entrepreneur either.  Corporate Entrepreneurship then resembles a non-controversial, risk-free, and feel-good version of the intrapreneurial experience out of the safe position as an appointed corporate cogwheel in a glorified project with a marketing blast and a defined career path waiting at the end of the project.

The Golden Opportunity

Now having said all this, there is no reason why true Intrapreneurs and Corporate Entrepreneurship programs should not be compatible in ways where they can benefit from each other mutually.

A savvy Intrapreneur could use company’s Corporate Entrepreneurship program as a vehicle to forward the Intrapreneur’s agenda somewhat in alignment with company goals and avoiding a frontal collision with the organizational immune system. In return, the company benefits from a driven Intrapreneur in the driver seat who can bring intrapreneurial passion to the project – with a lot of ‘If’:

  • If they are willing to embrace the disruptive challenge of bringing about meaningful change,
  • If they are able to identify true Intrapreneurs in their organization and
  • If they are bold enough to take a chance on Intrapreneurs by allowing them into the program in the first place. Remember, Intrapreneurs tend to be disagreeable among other ‘features’ that, often enough, not win them an invitation by management to join their fancy Corporate Entrepreneurship program.

All these ‘If’ remain the biggest obstacles across corporations to embrace Intrapreneurs. More recently, the phrase “culture fit” tends to disqualify Intrapreneurs and their passion ‑or‑ as the Contently founder Shane Snow puts it: “When an organization has an ethos rooted in ‘culture fit,’ a nasty hidden habit develops. Whenever someone has an idea that doesn’t ‘fit’ the established way of thinking or of doing things, they’ll either shut up or they’ll get shut down.”

There is something about the passionate individual and somewhat renegade employee with a vision and a transformative idea that challenges the status quo, group-think, or widely accepted goals in

an organization who may just need that disruptive or transformational idea to grow, outrun their competition, or even survive while rejecting the change initially. In the end, it comes down to the power of one individual that envisions greatness and brings it to life against all obstacles.

Table Intra vs Corp Entre v2

Will technology always outpace us? – What we can do to keep up

We measure ‘progress’ by the speed of technological progress: The more inventions and the faster our technology evolves the more progress or society makes, right?
But we also feel like drowning in the flood of ever-more technology pouring over us.
This is not about surrender but of awareness and taking control again.

We measure ‘progress’ by the speed of technological progress: The more inventions and the faster our technology evolves the more progress or society makes, right?
But we also feel like drowning in the flood of ever-more technology pouring over us.

This is not about surrender but of awareness and taking control again.

In my linked article on LinkedIn, I researched some background in a quest to find meaning – and a way out:  How Virtual Distance beats the ‘Culture Lag’ of Technology

Please share your thoughts and experiences too – thanks.

Intrapreneurship: Designing sustainable innovation ecosystems! – Executive Webinars in Oct/Nov 2017

Intrapreneurship: Designing sustainable innovation ecosystems! – New Executive Webinar Series in Oct/Nov 2017

Register now for my new Intrapreneurship series of Executive Webinars starting in October 2017 and powered by Ijona Skills:

  1. The Power of Intrapreneurship – an Introduction
    Online only October 18, 2017 – recording available
  2. “Where to start?” – Designing a sustainable innovation ecosystem in a large company for exponential returns
    Online only – October 31, 2017 – coming up
  3. “Against all Odds” – Implementing a sustainable innovation ecosystem in a large company
    Online only – November 15, 2017

The three webinars build upon each other and provided maximum value when attended in this sequence (they are being recorded, so no you can catch up if you missed one)

Join the Circle of Young Intrapreneurs NYC Chapter: Launch Event May 3, 2017

Circle of Young Intrapreneurs NYC Chapter

SIGN UP HERE for free tickets!

A movement designed to inspire, guide, develop & deliver purpose-driven business ideas from young social intrapreneurs inside corporate organizations globally.

We drive positive social change through business by creating a community of changemakers, supporting them with mentoring and advice from leading intrapreneurs, encouraging pan-industry collaboration to solve shared societal challenges and promote advocacy of social intrapreneurship.

Join us and make the business a force for good.

Event: Global Growth – Next Practice Strategies In Customer Experience, Talent & Transformation, Apr.6, NYC

Global CEOs, Top HR and Key Influencers share strategies

Global Growth – Next Practice Strategies In Customer Experience, Talent & Transformation (Event)

Register (at the bottom of the webpage) to join Global CEOs, Top HR and Key Influencers share strategies at the
Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business 601 Lexington Ave. 26th Fl. New York, NY 10022

‘Leading in an Ambiguous World’

How to stay ahead and aligned in today’s fast changing markets, talent compression, regulatory shifts and technology disruptions. A fast paced, highly interactive collaboration among global leaders on emerging trends.

Featured presentations:

  • How to build a Global Customer & Client Centric Organization- the 8 key behavioral and operational dimensions
  • How to create a Culture that supports Innovation and Intrapreneurship
  • 2020 – The Next Practices in Global Talent Development and Mobility
  • Staying ahead of Regulatory Shifts and leveraging Technology for Operational and Market Advantage

 

Visit GACCNY’s Health Tech Insight Panel, Mar.29, NYC

The panel will cover innovations and trends in the health tech space and will feature Alex Fair, CEO of Medstartr, a leading medtech fund, accelerator and crowdfunding platform, Loren Busby, angel investor with Mid Atlantic Bio Angels, and Mette Dyhrberg, Founder of MyMee, a successful big data symptom management startup. It is an event you won’t want to miss!Wednesday, March 29, 2017 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)

GACCNY’s Health Tech Insight Panel

We are excited to partner on a new collaboration with the German American Chamber of Commerce (GACC): an expert panel event focused on innovations in health-tech.GACC

The panel will cover innovations and trends in the health tech space and will feature Alex Fair, CEO of Medstartr, a leading medtech fund, accelerator and crowdfunding platform, Loren Busby, angel investor with Mid Atlantic Bio Angels, and Mette Dyhrberg, Founder of MyMee, a successful big data symptom management startup. It is an event you won’t want to miss!

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)

REGISTER HERE!

Add to my calendar

Spark Labs (Bryant Park)
25 West 39th St.
14th Floor
New York, NY 10018


Agenda
6:00pm     Registration, Networking & Snacks
6:30pm     Panel Discussion: Life Science
7:45pm     More Networking & Snacks

About VentureOutventureout_logo700x700

VentureOut, the event organizer, is focused on enabling the world’s most promising technology organizations to launch into new markets, raise capital, and scale. Based on the philosophy that talent is evenly distributed but opportunity is not, VentureOut’s mission is to bridge that gap between the entrepreneurial talent around the world and the vast opportunities available to them in New York City & San Francisco. Through short-form strategy development and capital raising programs, VentureOut immerses the world’s most talented entrepreneurs into the US technology ecosystem, fast tracking their growth by establishing relationships with top tech influencers, investors, and new prospective clients. To date, VentureOut has supported the growth of over 500 companies (700+ entrepreneurs) from 20 different countries. VentureOut was founded by Brian Frumberg in 2012. (www.ventureoutny.com)

Apply for ASHOKA Social Intrapreneurship for Innovation in Health and Wellness 2017

Sign up for this unique professional development opportunity, where health and wellness professionals and social innovators from organizations around the world will come together to innovate in this online course.

Four years ago, I helped to launch the “Social Intrapreneurship for Innovation in Health and Wellness” program of ASHOKA in cooperation with Boehringer Ingelheim.  With overwhelming success, the program was repeated every year since 2014 and is being offered again this year from April 24 thru June 2, 2017!

Who should sign up?

Sign up for this unique professional development opportunity, where health and wellness professionals and social innovators from organizations around the world will come together to innovate in this online course.

What is Social Intrapreneuring?

Social Intrapreneurship is a methodology for cultivating and advancing social innovation within institutions by adopting agile, strategies while building essential skills such as leadership, empathy, teamwork and change-making. This 5th edition of the course is sponsored by the Making More Health initiative – creating a healthier world for individuals, families and their communities through social entrepreneurship and intrapreneurial thinking.

Where do I sign up?

Check out the course sign-up page: http://bit.ly/socintspring2017
Space is limited and based on a first-come, first-served basis. Participants will also be vetted based on criteria and fit for the course. We strongly encourage Boehringer Ingelheim employees, as well as health and wellness social entrepreneurs and professionals to apply.

Course Details
Application Opens: NOW
Application Deadline: April 13th
Course start date: April 24th
Course end date: June 2nd

Expected Time Commitment: 2-3 hr/week time-flexible, self-paced and interactive.

Questions?

If you have any questions about the course, please feel free to email the organizaers at courses@ashoka.org

Meet me at 2017 ISPIM Innovation Forum XXVII- Fostering Innovation Ecosystems

Join my session on “Building a Sustainable Innovation Ecosystem in a Global Corporation” in the Innovation Culture & Ecosystems track on March 21.

Meet me at the International Society for Professional Innovation Management (ISPIM) Conference 2017 ISPIM Innovation Forum XXVII- Fostering Innovation Ecosystems in Toronto, Canada on March 19-22, 2017!

Join my session on “Building a Sustainable Innovation Ecosystem in a Global Corporation” in the Innovation Culture & Ecosystems track on March 21.

Blog ISPIM Toronto event picture

 

What my session is about?

Large pharmaceutical (and other) organizations struggle with the tectonic shifts and fundamental changes across the landscapes worldwide. The traditional mindset and business models are failing. A rejuvenating and holistic transformation effort is needed to get nimble again and adapt to the new reality.
How do you change a stagnant innovation culture and create a sustainable ecosystem within a global organization that stands the challenges of real life?
As an example, this case study discusses the comprehensive yet practical approach that mobilized hidden talent and resources transforming Boehringer Ingelheim, a Global FORTUNE 500 pharmaceutical company, from within on a global scale. It generated exponential returns and fundamentally changed the culture of the organization from leadership training and managerial decision-making down to bringing grass-root ideas to a break-through and new career paths for employees.

What is the Problem?

The issue is universal and not limited to a pharmaceutical or healthcare company: There is no lack of great ideas aiming beyond incremental improvement at the grassroots of large organizations. There is also no lack of funds or support for break-through ideas on the top of the hierarchy; in fact, leadership is constantly seeking for good ideas. However, there are many obstacles bringing them together.
One problem is how to connect the people with great, disruptive ideas with the ones that have the authority and resources to making them happen in the organization?
A second problem is how to find and vet the ideas that have a game-changing potential and develop them with limited risk?
The third problem is that even with executive support it can be hard to implement a new idea against the resistance of the organization, which rejects them as disrupting the equilibrium of the status quo.
The proposed session illustrates and discusses the real-life experiences of building and operating a holistic and sustainable framework that successfully addressed the issue, overcame resistance on many levels, and yielded an exponential return-of-investment. It resulted in a visible and measurable way changed innovation mindset and changed behaviors throughout the organization to bring disruptive ideas and projects to life.

Where do I find more Information on the Topic?

Visit my blog OrgChanger.com to read more about intrapreneuring with case studies and real-life success stories!

Rethink Healthcare – Workshop – Berlin, Germany – April 11, 2017 #rethinkhealthcare17

Sign up for RETH!NK HEALTHCARE! – Big Data, Augmented Reality, Wearables
and visit my workshop “Digitale Disruption im Gesundheitssystem: Was sind die Risiken und Chancen für Pharmaunternehmen?” in the heart of Berlin, Germany, on April 11, 2017! – Follow the event on Twitter #rethinkhealthcare17

speaker

 

How to become a “Partner of Choice”? (Article)

Expert advice on open innovation from executives with experience at Bayer, Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim published in the December/January 2017 issue of the Healthcare Sales & Marketing Magazine (HS&M) e-magazine:

How to become a Partner of Choice (.pdf)

Join Executive Round Table event: “The innovation and technology convergence in Life Science and Healthcare industry”

With improved technology, especially, Artificial Intelligence, what physicians will be needed in the future?
Join the Executive Round Table event on Nov. 22, 2016 featuring “The innovation and technology convergence in Life Science and Healthcare industry”

Life Science Quest and the Sino-American Pharmaceutical Professionals Association, Connecticut (SAPA-CT) work together bringing a series of high-level professional and business development events to Life Science and Health Care industry in the TriState Metropolitan area, providing high level business networking, round tables discussions and business seminars. 

This joint event of Life Science Quest and SAPA-CT in the Life Science & Healthcare series is to be held 22 November 2016 6:00 PM at Mount Saint Mary College  (330 Powell Avenue, Newburgh, NY. Aquinas Hall room 163).

Eyeforpharma on Open Innovation – How to become a ‘Partner of Choice’?

The Art of Innovation: How to Become a “Partner of Choice” is an insightful interview with seasoned innovation professionals discussing what it takes to build a Partner-of Choice-relationship with Open Innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.

The Art of Innovation: How to Become a “Partner of Choice” is an insightful interview with seasoned innovation professionals discussing what it takes to build a Partner-of Choice-relationship with Open Innovation in the pharmaceutical industry.